Demi Lovato suffered three strokes, heart attack after 2018 overdose

Demi Lovato

Demi Lovato suffered three strokes, heart attack after 2018 overdose

In a trailer for her YouTube docuseries "Demi Lovato: Dancing with the Devil." the singer reveals details of her health ordeal.

Demi Lovato suffered three strokes, heart attack after 2018 overdose – Chicago Sun-Times

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Demi Lovato reveals she suffered three strokes, heart attack after 2018 overdose

In a trailer for her YouTube docuseries “Demi Lovato: Dancing with the Devil.” the singer reveals details of her health ordeal.

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Feb 17, 2021, 4:59pm CST

Beth Harris, AP

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Demi Lovato reveals she suffered three strokes, heart attack after 2018 overdose

In this image from video, Demi Lovato performs during the “Celebrating America” event on Jan. 20.

AP

Demi Lovato’s drug overdose in 2018 resulted in the singer having three strokes and a heart attack, leaving her with physical limitations that still affect her.

Lovato reveals publicly for the first time details about the near-fatal incident in “Demi Lovato: Dancing With the Devil,” a four-part docuseries debuting March 23 on YouTube Originals.

In the trailer, Lovato says doctors told her family she had five to 10 minutes to live.

“I was left with brain damage, and I still deal with the effects of that today,” she said in a video call on Wednesday. “I don’t drive a car because I have blind spots in my vision. For a long time, I had a really hard time reading. It was a big deal when I was able to read a book, which was like two months later, because my vision was so blurry.”

Lovato said the lasting repercussions “are still there to remind me of what could happen if I ever get into a dark place again.”

The 28-year-old singer, who sported pink hair on the call, has been working since age 10, when she appeared on the TV series “Barney & Friends.” She went to rehab for the first time at 18, after struggling with bipolar disorder, anorexia and bullying.

Lovato has shared her private struggles before, in a 2012 MTV documentary and in a 2017 YouTube doc in which she said she was still dealing with alcohol and cocaine addictions after undergoing further rehab. She said speaking publicly on those programs provided her with the accountability that kept her sober for six years until her relapse in 2018.

“My purpose in putting this out is to help people who have been on the same path as I have,” she said. “I wanted to set the record straight, and I wanted to reveal it all for my fans. … Over the past couple years, I’ve heard a lot of stories about my life and what people think has happened, and I wanted to set the record straight, and I wanted to reveal it all for my fans and say, ‘Hey, this is who I am, and this is where I’m at today, and this is the journey that got me here. And if it helps you, then I hope that it can,’ because… my purpose in putting this out was to be able to help people that have been on the same path as I have.”

Lovato’s family, as well as Elton John and Christina Aguilera, are among those interviewed in the doc that was shot over a year. In the third segment, Lovato discusses past traumas in her life.

Lovato doesn’t relate to artists who claim they are most creative when they are in a dark place or using drugs.

“I feel like the best work that I make is when I’m present and when I am aware of what’s going on in my life,” she said. “That’s when the truth just flows out of me. As long as I continue to tell my truth, I’m going to make music that resonates with people.”

Lovato re-launched her singing career at last year’s Grammy Awards and sang the national anthem at the 2020 Super Bowl before the coronavirus pandemic took hold.

Last month, Lovato sang on a TV special marking President Joe Biden’s inauguration.

Despite her near-death experience, Lovato wouldn’t change what happened to her.

“Everything had to happen in order for me to learn the lessons that I learned,” she said. “I look back and sometimes I get sad when I think of the pain that I had to endure to overcome what I have. I’m so proud of the person that I am today. One of the main reasons I’m coming forward is so I never have to live that life again.”

Lovato also addressed the motivation for bringing raw honesty to her music, explaining: “I’m a truth teller, and truth tellers on this planet help other people seek truth within themselves. If we don’t acknowledge our feelings, if we’re not vulnerable with other people, we’re never going to experience the internal growth that we need to survive and that we need to help make this world a better place for other people.”

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