We are united. US marks 18th anniversary of 9/11 terror attack with silence, tolling bells

We are united. US marks 18th anniversary of 9/11 terror attack with silence, tolling bells

9/11

We are united. US marks 18th anniversary of 9/11 terror attack with silence, tolling bells

Bells tolled across New York City, President Donald Trump spoke at the Pentagon and moments of silence were observed in Shanksville, Pennsylvania and across the nation Wednesday as America commemorated the 18th anniversary of the Sept. 11 terror …
We are united. US marks 18th anniversary of 9/11 terror attack with silence, tolling bells

9/11 terror attacks: How nation, Trump honoring victims

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On the 18th anniversary of the Sept. 11 terror attacks, President Trump and the nation honor the victims at the Pentagon, in New York and Pennsylvania

Post to Facebook’We are united.’ US marks 18th anniversary of 9/11 terror attack with silence, tolling bells

On the 18th anniversary of the Sept. 11 terror attacks, President Trump and the nation honor the victims at the Pentagon, in New York and Pennsylvania

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'We are united.' US marks 18th anniversary of 9/11 terror attack with silence, tolling bells, USA TODAY
Published 8:07 a.m. ET Sept. 11, 2019 | Updated 12:58 p.m. ET Sept. 11, 2019CLOSE

We will never forget the lives lost on September 11th at the World Trade Center, the Pentagon and on United Flight 93 in Shanksville, Pennsylvania.
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Bells tolled across New York City, President Donald Trump spoke at the Pentagon and moments of silence were observed in Shanksville, Pennsylvania and across the nation Wednesday as America commemorated the .

Politics also took center stage, with Trump targeting the Taliban and a ground zero family member taking aim at comments made by a Muslim congresswoman.

In New York, the names of the almost 3,000 victims were solemnly read at the National September 11 Memorial & Museum. Intermittent moments of silence marked the impact times for the second ground zero plane, the moments when each tower collapsed, and the impact times for the planes that struck the Pentagon and a field in Shanksville, Pennsylvania.

“Eighteen years have not lessened our loss,” said Mary Ann Marino after reading some of the victims’ names that included her son, firefighter Kenneth Marino.

The first moment of silence was observed at 8:46 a.m. ET to mark the time when American Airlines Flight 11, en route to Los Angeles from Boston when it was hijacked, slammed  into the north face of the World Trade Center’s North Tower.

Son of 9/11 victim addresses Ilhan Omar:

More moments of silence followed. At 9:03 a.m., for United Airlines Flight 175, also bound for Los Angeles from Boston when it crashed into the south face of the World Trade Center’s South Tower. At 9:37 a.m., for American Airlines Flight 77, scheduled to fly from Washington to Los Angeles when it hit the Pentagon.

At 10:03, for Flight 93, flying from Newark, New Jersey, to San Francisco when it slammed into a western Pennsylvania field. 

The World Trade Center’s South Tower collapsed at 9:59 a.m.; the North Tower fell 29 minutes later.

The New York ceremony was open only to family members of victims, but the event was streamed live. The memorial will open to the public later in the day.

President Donald Trump led a brief remembrance on the South Lawn of the White House, joined by hundreds of guests that included 9/11 survivors and family members and current and former law enforcement personnel. He then spoke at a Pentagon ceremony, where 184 people were killed that day.

“Today the nation honors and mourns nearly 3,000 lives that were stolen from us,” Trump said. He recounted going to Ground Zero after the planes hit. And he promised the victims – and the survivors – won’t be forgotten.

“We are united with you in grief,” he said. “We offer you all that we have. Our unwavering loyalty, our undying devotion, our eternal pledge that your loved ones will never, ever be forgotten.”

Trump , blaming them for the cancellation of Afghanistan peace talks and claiming that U.S. forces have “hit them” harder than ever.

“And if for any reason they ever come back to our country, we will go wherever they are and use power the likes of which the U.S. has never used before,” Trump said.

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The terrorist attacks that took place on September 11, 2001 shocked the United States, marking a national tragedy remembered for years to come. From candle vigils to permanent memorials, take a look at how Americans have remembered the victims in the years following. Robert Deutsch, USA TODAYA crowd begins to disperse after a memorial lighting of two spot lights representing the Twin Towers in New York’s Battery Park City on March 11, 2002. The memorial honored the six month anniversary of the World Trade Center attacks. Todd Plitt, USA TODAYA Shanksville fireman’s coat joins the flags, caps, helmets and other gifts as part of the temporary memorial at the Flight 93 crash site September 11, 2003 in Shanksville, Pennsylvania. One of the four planes involved in the September 11 attacks crashed into a rural field from the presumed target of the nation’s capital, killing 40 men and women. Archie Carpenter, Getty ImagesRalph Pasqualicchio, right, breaks down along with firefighter Freeman Hochong and wife Betsy during a memorial service at Ground Zero September 11, 2003 in New York City. Pasqualicchio lost a friend in the World Trade Center terrorist attacks and Hochong was a volunteer recovery worker at Ground Zero. The memorial honored the two-year anniversary of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks. Mario Tama, Getty ImagesA woman waves an American flag to honor victims of the World Trade Center terrorist attacks during a memorial service at Ground Zero September 11, 2003 in New York City. Mario Tama, Getty ImagesPresident George W. Bush wipes his face as he breaks ground with, from left to right: Ian Siegel, Arlene Howard, Janet Wexler Magee, Thomas Suozzi and George Pataki at a ceremony for the Nassau County 9/11 Memorial in East Meadow, N.Y. on March 11, 2004. Charles Dharapak, APA flower memorial at Ground Zero is displayed on the fourth anniversary of the September, 11 terrorist attacks on September 11, 2005. Todd Plitt, USA TODAYMourners stand next to a memorial of flowers near a reflecting pool in the footprint of the North Tower on September 11, 2005 in New York City during the fourth anniversary commemoration of the September 11 terrorist attacks on the US. Chip East, AFP/Getty ImagesOlivia Campbell and John Halbi look at a memorial display while they tour the south end of The World Trade Center site on August 9, 2006 at Ground Zero. Todd Plitt, USA TODAYPostcards of the original Twin Towers are posted in memorial on the south side of The World Trade Center site on August 9, 2006 at Ground Zero. Todd Plitt, USA TODAYA group of police officers look at the North Tower reflecting pool on September 11, 2006 before a ceremony at the site of the former World Trade Center marking the fifth anniversary of the September 11th attacks, in New York. John O’Boyle, AFP/Getty ImagesThe Morris County, September 11th Memorial which has 5 tons of World Trade Center steel, pieces of flight 93 and dirt from the Pentagon, on September 8. 2007. Todd Plitt, USA TODAYA woman walks through some of the nearly 3000 United States flags that make up the “Healing Field” outside the Pentagon during the dedication of the Pentagon Memorial September 11, 2008 in Arlington, Virginia. The memorial, made up of 184 “memorial units,” is dedicated to each individual victim killed at the Pentagon when American Airlines Flight 77 slammed into the Department of Defense’s headquarters. Chip Somodevilla, Getty ImagesPedestrians walk by a memorial to a victim of the September 11 terrorist attacks next to Ground Zero September 11, 2008 in New York City. Spencer Platt, Getty ImagesFamily members of victims stand in the rain and write on the reflecting pool placing flowers as people gather at Ground Zero during a 9/11 memorial ceremony on September 11, 2009 in New York City. Family of the victims, government officials and others gathered at the annual ceremony to remember the attacks that killed more than 2,700 people with the destruction of the World Trade Center, the crash at the Pentagon and United 93 in Shanksville, Pennsylvania on September 11, 2001. David Handschuh, Pool, Getty ImagesThe South Memorial Pool is under construction, with the Freedom Tower behind, under construction on August 10, 2010. Robert Deutsch, USA TODAY New York police and firefighters and Port Authority police salute during the singing of the Star Spangled Banner at one of the entrances of 9/11 Memorial Plaza during the tenth anniversary ceremonies at the site of the World Trade Center September 11, 2011, in New York. Chip Somodevilla, Pool, Getty ImagesNelson Rivera touches his hand to the name of his son, Isaias Rivera, whose name is on the wall at the Empty Sky Memorial in Jersey City, NJ on September 11, 2011. Nelson was getting ready to leave the memorial after putting up a flag near his son’s name. Isaias, who lived in Jersey City, worked as a financial advisor in Tower I of the World Trade Center and was 23 at the time of his death. The Empty Sky Memorial is dedicated to residents of New Jersey who died on September 11, 2001. Eileen Blass, USA TODAYPresident Barack Obama, First Lady Michelle Obama, former President George Bush and former First Lady Laura Bush visit the Memorial at ground zero during tenth anniversary ceremonies at the site of the World Trade Center September 11, 2011, in New York. Robert Deutsch, USA TODAYVisitors come together at the memorial wall with the names of people aboard Flight 93 during the night illumination of the memorial following the September 10 dedication ceremony of the Flight 93 National Memorial in Shanksville, Pennsylvania on September 11, 2011. Jack Gruber, USA TODAYThe 9/11 Memorial can be seen from the 90th story of One World Trade Center on April 30, 2012 in New York City. One World Trade Center is being built to replace the twin towers destroyed in the Sept. 11 attacks. It reached just over 1,250 feet on making it just taller than the observation deck on the Empire State Building. Lucas Jackson, Pool, Getty ImagesA maintenance worker cleans the panels containing names of the victims of the terrorist attacks on December 29, 2011 in New York City. Spencer Platt, Getty ImagesFamily members of Flight 93 victims make their way to visit the crash site at the Flight 93 Memorial on September 11, 2013. The memorial honors the 40 passengers and crew of United Flight 93 who lost their lives in disrupting the attack on the nationÕs capital on September 11, 2001. Jack Gruber, USA TODAYPeople arrive at the Flight 93 Memorial Wall of Names early in the morning on September 11, 2013 prior to memorial service. Jack Gruber, USA TODAYBlake Catanese, 2, sits among 40 luminaria lit at the Flight 93 Memorial Wall of Names on the evening of Tuesday, September 10, 2013, one candle for each passenger or flight crew member aboard United Flight 93 on September 11, 2001. Jack Gruber, USA TODAYMembers of the New York Police Department, Fire Department of New York and Port Authority Police Department at the beginning of the memorial observances at the site of the World Trade Center in New York on September 11, 2014. Andrew BurtonOne World Trade center is seen in the New York City skyline on August 8, 2017. The new building opened in November 2014. Robert Deutsch, USA TODAYLaura Bivona holds up a photo of her husband who died in the September 11th attacks outside the 9/11 Memorial on September 25, 2015. Michael Monday, for USA TODAYFlowers and flags are stuck in the plaques along the pool of the South Tower on September 11, 2016. Chris Pedota, The RecordA woman becomes emotional during a memorial for the victims of the September 11 terrorist attacks on September 10, 2016. Chris Pedota, The RecordMarines are reflected in the water of the Massachusetts Fallen Heroes Memorial, as Boston Fire Dept. truck’s ladder hold an American flag during a re-dedication ceremony held at the site on May 27, 2017, on Northern Avenue. The event was part of The Memorial Day weekend, and honored those in the service who lost their lives. More names were added and to the memorial. The memorial honors those from Massachusetts who have lost their lives since September 11, 2001 in the global war on terrorism. John Tlumacki, APArmy Sgt. Edwin Morales of the Bronx kisses up to the sky as part of honoring his cousin, Ruben Correa a NY firefighter who died on 9/11 on September 11, 2018. Chris Pedota, USA TODAY NETWORKThe family of United flight 93 passenger Tom Burnett watch a memorial video before the game between the Minnesota Twins and the New York Yankees on September 11, 2018 at Target Field in Minneapolis. Hannah Foslien, Getty ImagesThe waxing gibbous moon peeks over One World Trade Center in New York City on March 19, 2019. Thomas P. Costello, Asbury Park PressA U.S. flag hanging from a steel girder, damaged in the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks on the World Trade Center, blows in the breeze at a memorial in Jersey City, N.J., Sept. 11, 2019 as the sun rises behind One World Trade Center building and the re-developed area where the Twin Towers of World Trade Center once stood in New York City on the 18th anniversary of the attacks. J. David Ake, APPeople observe a moment of silence during ceremonies at the National September 11 Memorial on September 11, 2019 in New York City. Throughout the country services are being held to remember the 2,977 people who were killed in New York, the Pentagon and in a field in rural Pennsylvania. Spencer Platt, Getty ImagesInterested in this topic? You may also want to view these photo galleries:ReplayAutoplayShow ThumbnailsShow Captions

City and towns across the nation also marked the anniversary. And in Michigan, .

Bloomfield Hills Baptist Church announced in a one-sentence email Monday evening that it was canceling the two-day “9/11 forgotten? Is Michigan surrendering to Islam?” event that was scheduled for Wednesday and Thursday. The event was slated to host two speakers addressing topics such as “How the interfaith movement is sabotaging America and the church” and “How Islam is destroying America from within.”

Contributing: David Jackson, USA TODAY; Emma Keith, Detroit Free Press; The Associated Press

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Sights and sounds of this day in 2001, when America suffered the worst terrorist attack on its soil. (Sept. 11)
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